S. Park (aka sparky) toiling away at everything and nothing for a bleak final outcome for Unit 14 of BA Graphic Design at CSM

Exploring the visual culture of WWII, in comparison to the visual culture of modern warfare.
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Outfit

Research

Scanned from ‘A Manual for the Wearing of Orders, Decorations and Medals’, Andrew Hanham, 2005, Spink & Sons ltd, London, pg 79

Royal Navy – Personnel ribbons 13mm. When five or more are worn the ribbon is 10mm deep. With No.1C Dress the ribbons are sewn on the garments, but with No. !CW Dress a detachable, brooch-type ribbon bar is worn with the pin inserted through beckets in the correct positions.

* The ribbons in each row show all be visible and not covered by the left lapel. The top or only row show be 24mm below the point of the shoulder.

Scanned from ‘A Manual for the Wearing of Orders, Decorations and Medals’, Andrew Hanham, 2005, Spink & Sons ltd, London, pg 87

Army – Personnel ribbons width: 9.5mm. A single ribbon, or incomplete row of ribbons should be centered over the breast pocket button. The maximum number of ribbons in each row is either four or five, depending on the physigue of the individual and the type of uniform coat.

Scanned from ‘A Manual for the Wearing of Orders, Decorations and Medals’, Andrew Hanham, 2005, Spink & Sons ltd, London, pg 92

Royal Air Force – Personnel ribbons 11mm in depth. Senior ribbon worn nearest the lapel, and in the top row when more than one row is worn. A row should not consist of more than four ribbons, but when more than four are worn, they should be arranged to display as many complete rows of four as possible, with any incomplete row being placed centrally at the top and containing the ribbons of the most senior awards held.

All info from ‘A Manual for the Wearing of Orders, Decorations and Medals’, Andrew Hanham, 2005, Spink & Sons ltd, London

Spink’d

Out & About,, Research

I remembered seeing medals and ribbons displayed in a window of a store somewhere in Covent Garden so after the tutorial with Max I went out for an excursion to find the shop. The particular store I remembered was easy to find, one called Toye Kenning & Spencer LTD just opposite the Freemasons Hall on Great Queen Street, but I had no idea the entire store was for medals badges and trophies for the Freemasons society. I asked a store assistant whether they sold medal ribbons and he said they’re quite hard to comeby to begin with, but that I should try Spink which is just up Southampton Row. Well how very convenient.

I walked to Spink, and then walked past it. I would’ve never realized it was a shop if not for the fact that I was looking for it. There was no shop window, the only thing on display was a face of what looked to be Tsar Nicholas II and no they weren’t selling that picture… I think. Über exclusive entrance too, no?

Inside, when I asked about literature on medals of the world wars I was introduced to a lovely lady called Catherine, who picked out books that might be of use. Turns out there aren’t any books specifically on the medals and accomplishment awards of the Second World War, but of all the wars, including contemporary depending on when the book was published. Then she disappeared through a set of doors and emerged 10 minutes later with a handful of ‘scrap’ medal ribbons. Wowza, here’s where my project kicks off properly I guess.

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To-Do List
  • Do mock-up of Jacket and figure out max ribbon panel count
  • Figure out number of categories & order ribbons!
  • Obtain statistics for the categories
  • Visit Imperial War Museum
  • Visit National Army Museum
  • Visit the 'Decode' Exhibition at V&A
  • Explore visual culture of War - information graphics?